Motorcycle Alabama

Open House => GPS & Other Technology => Topic started by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 07:59:58 AM

Title: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 07:59:58 AM
so, you want a shiny new GPS to .... do something for your motorcycling/outdoors adventures ?

OK, here are some things to understand:
tracks - are generally like gold nuggets of wisdom. someone actually recorded hundreds or thousands of track points as they canoed (yes  boats too!) hiked, biked, motorcycled, glided (gloed? lol) or otherwise traversed the planet. sometimes they include waypoints, which are like diamonds in a gold mine, for free. tracks CAN be generated by a computer /Program also, but generally they are recorded wonderful things you can trust to be good /reliable in every way.

waypoints- these are diamonds. someone recorded a locations' coordinates, along with (if you're really lucky) a description, photos (geotagged) , videos, audio (from the river babbling along) , or even typed out some history of the location, hours  of operation, gas stations near by,  river levels (for crossing/fishing) or maybe even a URL link to the local happens/Facebook pages in the area. again, waypoints are diamonds !

routes - are the devil. they lie. they deceive. the flirt. they cajole. they sell you a beautiful dream, but deliver a sandy crack. these are computer generated GUESSES that some evil scientist created an algorithm years ago, to produce more lies spun off from previous lies. routes are generally a way that MIGHT work, but haven't been tried/tested yet. the road might be there, or once was, but more than likely you will have a u turn out twenty to complete before your destination.

maps-  are not tracks, or routes ! maps are simply the background that entertains your mind and orients your soul as you look at squiggly lines on the screen. maps can be topographic, photographic, simple, or very complex. you might can build a route you want to follow via that map, if it has enough roads and trails on it. more than likely you'll want.....

routing data- routing data is what most people confuse with maps, tracks and routes. it's none of those, but plays a role in all of them. routing data are the trails, roads, passes, etc that mapping programs use to draw those imaginary routes (and sometimes tracks) on the screen. routing data -can- be included in, or tied to, a map, but lots and lots of maps do not have routing data included. this frees up a lot of space for smaller file sizes, or higher detail in images...

which leads us to vector vs raster...

vector maps-  are tiny in size but broad in coverage and detail. these are maps that the GPS creates from math, on the fly. it's data that tells the programs where a steam/clubhouse/road is, but doesn't depend on images being stored to produce what you see. it builds the images, as you all for them in your panning and zooming around the screen. for instance, the entire USA is about 4gb in size, which is tiny for the amount of detail it has.

raster maps- are images. compressed or not, they depend on the level of detail in each image as to whether it will give you a good zoomable map, or just a basic over view of the land. the entire USA of a similar detailed view to the vector map  in raster (image based) format would be around 100-300gb, or more.

poi- points of interest, were nuggets of gold once.... back when their information was relative, to whatever company thought they were important. or were paid to say they were important. or some group of folks thought they needed to be distributed across the globe. these are similar to waypoints, except they are usually ten times removed from your current hobby/activity, created by someone who might have ridden a motorcycle once, at aunt Emma's birthday party.... but they didn't include food info like waypoints usually do. pois can be great, but they usually are dated.

.....
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 08:33:50 AM
map overlays.....


the base map is what your eyes like to see, behind the tracks/waypoints/overlays/weather radar/traffic layers, that are on top of it.

the base map can be raster (image) or  vector (computed on the fly). your additional layers can also be vector (computed) raster (image) based also.

map overlays are very useful for displaying local maps from trail head information stands at parks, online sources like forums, aviation charts, marine charts, or anything you want to have ovelayed on your map.

the first image is an example of osm (open street map) showing land based roads only.

the second shows a local chart at the bar that I snapped a picture of and created an overlay, so I could see where the lighthouse wreckage should be.

the third shows just how large an image can be overplayed onto a map, this covered several miles.

it takes about five minutes to snap that picture, Geo reference it, and overlay it on whichever base map you're accustomed to using...
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: Fencejumper09 on November 30, 2017, 08:46:50 AM
Now that is something new to me! What a cool idea! Thanks for sharing Kyle!
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 10:30:32 AM
creating a park map overlay....

lots and lots of parks and trail heads have maps on display. unfortunately their websites are usually decades behind the times, and have little to no mapping functionality. thanks to modern tools, you can create a map overlay, that is Geo referenced, and actually follows your base map as you pan and zoom. this is extremely helpful for hiking parks, and events that are large.

so, you take a picture or download the map from their website....

then add reference points that match both the landm marks on the downloaded image and your own base map.

finally, a kmz (Google earth uses kmz as their file format for overlays) is created, which is overlayed.

this layer can be exported and shared with other folks, very easily.

here is an example of the process....
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 10:41:55 AM
OK, everyone doesn't hike. I know this. just about everyone here has been to our plans to go to Barber vintage fest at some point. here's another example of what a map looks like overlaid for an event. it's a lot easier to find bathrooms, first aid, food, and basically anything you need in the event area.

Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 10:46:55 AM
in the previous post I attached the event map that was in the screen shots.

you can download that to your phone or computer.

Google earth, Garmin basecamp, gps visualizer (this one is online only), and if course several android/iOS applications /handheld GPS can display this kmz file , as you walk/drive around.

I won't get into the file location here, as there are so many applications and gps manufactures that it changes too much to cover them all.

Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 10:53:50 AM
file types.... everyone dreads this part because they have to convert stuff, before using it.

normally the most widely accepted file type for tracks (and routes) or waypoints is GPX.  yup I spelled it right, that's an X n the end. lots of gps manufacturers have tried to push their proprietary formats (to prop up their own business and stifle competition) but thankfully most of them have died because open file standards rule the electronic world.

so..... gpx is your friend. you can download, import, export, edit, upload, and share with just about every modern mapping device, if you're using GPX.

yes, even Google maps, Google earth, android applications, iOS applications, stand alone hiking/biking GPS units can handle this file type.

attached is a screen shot of some of the other popular file types, and the applications that normally use them. eventually they will fold, and succumb to the gpx standard, give them time. ;-)

Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: Fencejumper09 on November 30, 2017, 10:57:58 AM
Are you going to go through the process of making reference points? Are they latitude and longitude points?
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 11:04:28 AM
"that's all fine and good Kyle, but I really just want the file I can download and USE in my bike. how about just shutting up and giving me a ride loop, already ? "


I totally dig this. nobody wants to read a book to decipher a recipe  , they just want the dang recipe !

here, attached is a very simple gpx file for you to download and try out. either in Google earth, sine stinking phone app, your stand alone GPS, or just commit it to memory and go for a ride. totally up to you.

attached file is a fun street ride.

Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 11:28:31 AM
Are you going to go through the process of making reference points? Are they latitude and longitude points?

sure can.

there are lots of ways to do this.

google earth can take an image (I believe jpeg /png are the only accepted image types) and allow you to stretch/skew it to fit the background behind it. I'm not a fan of this method because it takes so much time to stretch and skew the image, and each time you do so it effects the rest of the image, making your previous skews off, just a little bit.

basecamp can do this also, but for sanity, I'll just say it "can" , and leave it at that.

probably the easiest and fastest way, is with an application. yup, simple applications are jumping ahead of the game with each update.

basically, you pick a landmark on your image , like the point of a lake, end of a road, edge of a building, or similarly easy-to-identify landmark, and push a pin in it . then you swap to the basemap layer and select the same location on it. this creates a reference point. after creating 4 (or more) reference points, the image will be Geo referenced by the application.

... but what does Geo referenced mean, anyway?

Geo referenced images are basically just images that have a grid of points stretched across them. each of those points correspond to your maps points, so the two grids line up (behind the scenes, invisibly) and the image appears to float on top of your preferred base map. since the image is covered to a kmz file, all those points and the image itself can be shared in one file. it's very handy, very fast, and the number of applications that can display is many.

I'll do a screen capture of the process in a free minutes and upload it to YouTube.
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 12:02:42 PM
here's a quick n dirty screen cappture of the process.

sorry, no audio, you probably don't want to hear the Yankees arguing about which pizza to order for lunch ... that are next door in the hospital waiting room. :-(


Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: Nice Goat on November 30, 2017, 12:08:53 PM
If we had a "Most Amazing New Thread" award, this thread would win.   :-*

Goes directly to sticky status....


Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 12:31:12 PM
more GPS stuff....

it doesn't matter what your preferred device is in this day n age, wrist watch, smartphone, stand alone, paper map, or all of them at once, it's just coordinates on a screen.... OK paper in some cases.

for instance, N 32.37113° , W 088.69923° will show you were I'm sitting right now. give or take 100 meters, since I'm sitting on the first floor of a four or five story building, there is a lot of "bounce" of the satellite pings, in between floors.

which leads us to ....
"how does that stuff work, and where does it work?"


it's really really simple:

the satellites (personally I think it's really just ground based, the world is flat, and the moon is a floating boobies) send a time stamped "ping" of data. if you have 3 or more pings to compare, your GPS antenna wool receive those pings and compare how long it took to get from each originating satellite, to your phone.

ahem, oops, I meant "gps unit". not phone. phones can't do GPS stuff in the middle of the dress.... hold on we'll get to that in a second.

so easy of those pings has a little bit of info, including the satellites position in the sky, and the time  , when it was sent.

your GPS unit compares the time lapse between the ping being sent vs your GPS device receiving it, and then does some simple triangle math to decide where you probably are. each time you get another ping, you get a better guesstimate of your location. add more satellite pings and you get more accurate guesses.

" why are you calling it guesses, idiot? "

I'm calling it guesses because there are lots of things that effect the radio wave pings, to speed then up, slow them down, reflect, refract, and bounce them around.

think about a spotlight shining down on the length of a shiny sky scraper. the windows will reflect some of the light, some if it will be direct also. your GPS has to choose which one of those reflections is the "real" signal, unaltered by the reflections. each "bounce" of the signal lies to the GPS, because the elapsed time is not exact anymore. keep in mind we're not talking seconds, but splits off fractions of seconds. each one matters and throws off the math in the process.

a big lake can give you extra "bounces" on the original signal.

sky scrapers too.

large canyon walls , yup.

if you happen to be under a few stories of a building, yup, lots of bounce if you have a usable signal at all.

.... lunch time .....


Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 12:32:33 PM
If we had a "Most Amazing New Thread" award, this thread would win.   :-*

Goes directly to sticky status....


there will be a reference to sections when I'm done.....


and then prime can skip all the crap and go to the gpx files to download ;-)
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: Fencejumper09 on November 30, 2017, 12:55:26 PM
Awesome! I never realized the capabilities of Locus! I just used it to record super fun singletrack!
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: Nice Goat on November 30, 2017, 12:59:46 PM
I just bought a Garmin Montana when I was in Canada in October.  It was a store closeout sale, and with the 0.76 exchange rate, I got it for about half it's normal price.  This thread is inspiring me to learn more about its capabilities.

Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 01:28:13 PM
geocaching...


wuuuut  ? Geo who ?

geocaching is a world wide game that anyone can play. there are caches stored all over the planet (it's flat, not round, right ?) that have gps coordinates , which are listed online. lots of times, I will search for caches near me, if in bout familiar with an area. they are usually located near pretty land formations, historic places  , wonders, and occasionally involve long hikes in the quiet woods. this pretty  much is exactly what dual sport riders live for, do it works well for me.

so, where do you get these caches ?

well, you can go online and read volumes and volumes of information from the people that place the caches, or just download the gpx (sometimes it's a LOC file) and go to it. it will include the location, the reason for placing it, some logs of people who have found it already, and possibly some pictures of the location also.

one our resident dual sport  / GPS / caching experts jrou111 can tell you a lot more, and has organized rides that included caching before.

it
is
a
hoot
of
a
good
time

so if he organizes another, you should definitely try to attend. nothing like riding around the beautiful roads of North West Georgia to make a weekend pretty grand. ;-)

here's an example of a"power trail " aka a lot of caches easy to get to, right off the road. (screen shot)

the smiley faces are found caches

you can plug in the coordinates from the screen shot to see where that fun gravel road runs through the forest. it's great for motorcycling a dual sport ;-)


Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 02:15:04 PM
I just bought a Garmin Montana when I was in Canada in October.  It was a store closeout sale, and with the 0.76 exchange rate, I got it for about half it's normal price.  This thread is inspiring me to learn more about its capabilities.



yes! please do!

the more folks that are recording tracks the better. it never fails, if I neglect to press the record button, I'll find all kinds of cool things, and have no way to find them again. ;-)

but if I do press record, I'll have a perfect track to revisit again, and pull several together to make a fun ride.


for instance, just now I recorded a short trip after lunch. asking the way I saw a chocolate goose and some pigmy Indians fighting over a Swisher Sweet.

now I can try and drive by there again over day, when they're old and gray, no one would believe I met them before they were famous. ;-)

but really, I end up recording a ton of useless tracks. sure, it might play to my favor in an accident or speeding ticket, but a lot of them are not worth keeping. I'll delete a few hundred miles of tracks each week.

screenshot of useless track, and gpx included because Thursday...






Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 02:30:10 PM
waypoints.... continued


waypoints are diamonds. sometimes diamonds in the rough, but diamonds none the less.


here are some examples of why I think of them as diamonds. back during the drought of 2016, we took advantage of the low water at Lake Purdy and went exploring. we found "the tops of ancient mountains buried in the mud", Christmas trees (fishing), drill bits (used as anchors once too many times), and... a bald eagle nest. thanks to a couple of recorded tracks, we can dish right on top of those spots, or drag the bottom to see if we can dredge useless things up again.

seeing the bald eagle was pretty awesome and completely unexpected. since the shore line kind of all blends together after a while, in glad I snapped a waypoint after he flew away. since then I've revisited that spot and seen him several times.

I won't post the coordinates of the eagles roost for obvious reasons, but anyone that would like a GPX track to follow, or waypoint, can get it with a simple request via pm.

there's so much more to come....


Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 02:55:29 PM
MAPS

maps are everywhere. paper maps on the wall are gorgeous, mystical things. who hiked into that valley to find the haints ? who discovered hooker point ? how the heck did they get over that gorge ? yup, think about it next time you stand next to older survey maps. somebody sweated through there.

so, where do you find maps ?

openandromaps
openstreetmaps
map quest
Google
navtech
bing
gis services
usgs
USFS
military
gpsfiledepot
old cartography buffs ?


yup, all of those and a whole lot more. and then digitize it !  like I mentioned earlier, you can create a kmz overlay from any picture. snap a picture of the underground waterways below Birmingham, and check out how it lines up with our current roads. ;-) there's a lot unseen in the ham.

some of the stand alone companies have tried to use proprietary formats to protect their maps (for sale) from people who are less than upstanding... but the number of people willing to pay for duplicity in the last decade has shrunk. duplicity ? yes, there are tons of mapping services all using the same ground data, licensing it to each other with little modifications/additions, that it seems pointless to pay for -just- a topo or -only- a hydrology layer, when all of them can be found in one map set from another vender.

so you prefer NatGeo, or Bing hybrid or USGS, or cnna, or Magellan topo, or whatever. cool. there is a LOT of personal preference in which map you see on someone's screen the most often.

using each source of map info to plot routes (the devils footprints) is a great way to see more of what the terrain has to offer. look at little river canyon. it's motorcycle mecca, with lots of stealth camping included, if you know where to look.




Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 03:10:14 PM
Awesome! I never realized the capabilities of Locus! I just used it to record super fun singletrack!

just recording a trail, to find out again later, is the sharpest pointiest tip top of the iceberg. integrating geotagged photos, lodging, ride videos, telemetry data, all come into play, or CAN come into play in today's ride reports. think how cool it would be to have a tour guide speak to you as you round the next curve, to remind you to look right for the view, instead of just saying "left turn on Windermere" in a robotic voice. ;-)

the more accustomed folks get to using their tech, the cooler ours going to get....
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: springer on November 30, 2017, 04:05:56 PM
Dag...bestest GPS thread EVER/\!
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on November 30, 2017, 06:52:00 PM
moving right along, let's talk sharing.

you have tracks, I have tracks. they should be free (as in information) and distributed. life is way to freaking short to keep everything private/secure/secret. yes, in saying this at the same time that I think every Facebook group should be secret, invite only, cool .



so, track sharing. etiquette says you should have the ride organizers permission, then a dash of common sense, before you're sharing the gpx with everyone on the internet. I have thousands of miles of tracks, some of which should be private forever, but others should be shared often between DS riders and street riders. stuff like back roads around 25, Talledega, north ms, north Georgia, Tennessee, etc are moto mecca. I'd you have legal tracks from those areas, yes  yes yes get your friends excited by showcasing them in the ride report section like klaviator does.

remember, waypoints are diamonds.... if you find a covered bridge, possum pass, booby trap, or gay bar you had a blast at, you should mark it and share.

it takes seconds to drop a waypoint and name it something relevant... which means post processing either on the unit, a phone/tablet, or back home at the Computer is a lot easier to recall why you marked it vs "waypoint 23" .

here's an example of a waypoint that has a great pile of info.... including a URL for the river levels, and at what point the levels are low enough to "hike" across.




Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: jrou111 on November 30, 2017, 11:44:16 PM
I've been doing a lot of diamond mining  8)

(flags are waypoints, colored/gray/black squiggly lines are tracks, camera icons are waterfalls)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/nkDdFxpZj5SD8UAuIJ4MBnjv_jjNd-8otKvZufTabSm5XA6cv5pHrVjOb87OjH-ZRa09relZLapYhfVg0iboVcqMBmGVa_omJsGLKZpCHRFq-KvaiOPaeRWsihepAaY7o0M18_n3BK30vjc4Lb3RATT4604IELFZTB3cHdPAX8VOmwVpZsMPrxFdKxgin30WSEesKEEtJ1Kmv6fI_TSQXczgDiWSnOuFbAF8km4g1Kcwi87TdQEtVpCHE3Yn-7HlN9qsrTtb-UH52_I5AntIi2B_vGl1OBm1JgaWKUVqaCR27_qYmYYVewCEtTf1jRygftygYaODKxWT8FSx3XVDJ27bq9d-5-OlCHtAMenbzQhZWGaw7om67o1pfCOhxDlW_VCMYlqg5HDlU0dgJsMM0ZqNoCzCcQIqGIN_b0M6IVssqrqltDk4gW5KxvLGjjga9jWH-B0nZBf34XxQIQoiMrFZyUUo7T88ZxXtYZTD8p-OUTv9djOPhRUNG8dF5wcLxEbhFMkp6N8gUFY92SMGKRfy89smnIYpWDlSAWw1U2MpO3ottHlMkj72Wv7yZHK_3cPExaL91soZSkcuLBGKEBNWoNeALrhCIvttIU9nR3rd9w2Y2sLB2btvZhSihi8_-aHPy53EGOFN4_yJzu7deiHWuogHqctKe6nd=w1763-h894-no)
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on December 01, 2017, 02:20:13 AM
I've been doing a lot of diamond mining  8)

(flags are waypoints, colored/gray/black squiggly lines are tracks, camera icons are waterfalls)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/nkDdFxpZj5SD8UAuIJ4MBnjv_jjNd-8otKvZufTabSm5XA6cv5pHrVjOb87OjH-ZRa09relZLapYhfVg0iboVcqMBmGVa_omJsGLKZpCHRFq-KvaiOPaeRWsihepAaY7o0M18_n3BK30vjc4Lb3RATT4604IELFZTB3cHdPAX8VOmwVpZsMPrxFdKxgin30WSEesKEEtJ1Kmv6fI_TSQXczgDiWSnOuFbAF8km4g1Kcwi87TdQEtVpCHE3Yn-7HlN9qsrTtb-UH52_I5AntIi2B_vGl1OBm1JgaWKUVqaCR27_qYmYYVewCEtTf1jRygftygYaODKxWT8FSx3XVDJ27bq9d-5-OlCHtAMenbzQhZWGaw7om67o1pfCOhxDlW_VCMYlqg5HDlU0dgJsMM0ZqNoCzCcQIqGIN_b0M6IVssqrqltDk4gW5KxvLGjjga9jWH-B0nZBf34XxQIQoiMrFZyUUo7T88ZxXtYZTD8p-OUTv9djOPhRUNG8dF5wcLxEbhFMkp6N8gUFY92SMGKRfy89smnIYpWDlSAWw1U2MpO3ottHlMkj72Wv7yZHK_3cPExaL91soZSkcuLBGKEBNWoNeALrhCIvttIU9nR3rd9w2Y2sLB2btvZhSihi8_-aHPy53EGOFN4_yJzu7deiHWuogHqctKe6nd=w1763-h894-no)


yes, yes you have ! that's what I'm talking about !
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on December 03, 2017, 06:48:13 PM
no go points...

here's a very short video showing how you can manipulate your route planning around no go points.

say you wanted to avoid a section of highway (malfunction junction anyone?) , bridge, subdivision, or whatever. drop a no go point on it, and if you want that no go to disappear after a while, put a termination date on the point. then you'll never have to clean them up after your routing is done ;-)

Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: IceCold4x4 on December 03, 2017, 09:31:07 PM
Damn.... Talk about information overload. Looks like I've got some playing to do...

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: Fencejumper09 on December 04, 2017, 11:11:19 AM
Hollytree didn't want to share their gpx for the new singletrack so I hacked this picture from Facebook. Thanks Kyle. This will have to work until we get up there and record some tracks!(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20171204/8d37c39228384a1b04175fe2485da46d.jpg)
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on December 04, 2017, 04:46:33 PM
I'm gonna start a "share your awesome ride track here!" thread pretty soon....

I know Mulley, Brian, James, and a few of you guys could totally pimp that beeyotch out!

having an index you could pull from on any given Saturda morning, load the "crazy train" playlist in the shuffle, and jam the fuck out for a few hours, all courtesy of the mo-al folks !
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: springer on December 11, 2017, 04:53:12 PM
 Has anyone tried "Gravelmap" https://gravelmap.com/ .   Just found it today.  Trying to figure is all out.  One dirt/gravel type road that looks interesting is Warrior Cemetary road off of Blackburn Rd. I am just trying how to figure out a route to get me there. It is  over the Franklin Ferry bridge to get there, so thats not a problem. The problem for me is how to show the route from "where I am" to "where I want to go".
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on December 13, 2017, 09:52:13 AM
Has anyone tried "Gravelmap" https://gravelmap.com/ .   Just found it today.  Trying to figure is all out.  One dirt/gravel type road that looks interesting is Warrior Cemetary road off of Blackburn Rd. I am just trying how to figure out a route to get me there. It is  over the Franklin Ferry bridge to get there, so thats not a problem. The problem for me is how to show the route from "where I am" to "where I want to go".

I've used gravelmap in the past, it's great if you don't mind taveling outside of bham a little ways.

the blackburn road area should look like this
<iframe src="https://gravelmap.com/embed/8037&600,300,i,1,roadmap" width="600" height="300" frameborder="0" seamless></iframe>

(if the embedded map fails I've attached to the gpx file you can download)

this is a short multi step process to get you to the START of that gpx track you downloaded from gravelmap or my attached file here on mo-al.

1 download the gpx, import it to your gps/phone/tablet and display it in whatever application you like
2 pick one end of the gpx to have your gps/phone/tablet route to, and set off on your adventure
3 once your arrive at the start of the gpx, you can turn off the turnbyturn navigation you were using, and just follow the track manually or start navigating that track.

i prefer to NOT use all-in-one routes for this kind of scenario because relying on an all-in-one that has been guesstimated by a computer usually means there are issues once you leave the warm comforts of home to go out and use that route.

if you use KURVIGER to do the 1,2,3 process above, it's pretty easy / simple. keep in mind I"m trying to suggest the easiest possible solution, not always the most feature packed. for instance, kurviger can't create routes (turn by turn nav) while offline (offline= no cellular / wifi service), but if you have loaded the gpx's prior to leaving, you're fine. kurviger can use MAPS while offline, and those maps are free download.

make sense ? like a potato in a blanket ? yep, good!
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: kylepeterson on December 13, 2017, 10:02:29 AM
KMZ ( Keyhole Markup Language, zipped) files can contain a good deal of info for mapping operations.

Let's run down a couple of simple scenarios.

1- you just want to share a MAP OVERLAY or PICTURE OF A MAP that you snapped and/or georeferenced and/or downloaded from some genius web service. great, they usually use KMZ for this type of file, and google earth, google my maps, similar mapping programs can import and display that KMZ file for you. you can even convert it into a route/track if you need, but that's pretty lengthy/complicated compared to just geting the idea of what KMZ's can do for you.

cool, email, bluetooth, wifi, or whatever means you have will transfer that file to whoever else wants it. then they can display it on their phone/tablet/gps/computer/whatever and see what you wanted to share.

2- you want to capture everything on your mapping programs screen. all the waypoints, tracks/routes etc will be zipped into one neat little file that you can share.

as an example, I've attached a KMZ file that you can download and view on your phone/tablet/gps/computer.
Title: Re: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: springer on December 13, 2017, 11:57:15 AM
KMZ ( Keyhole Markup Language, zipped) files can contain a good deal of info for mapping operations.

Let's run down a couple of simple scenarios.

1- you just want to share a MAP OVERLAY or PICTURE OF A MAP that you snapped and/or georeferenced and/or downloaded from some genius web service. great, they usually use KMZ for this type of file, and google earth, google my maps, similar mapping programs can import and display that KMZ file for you. you can even convert it into a route/track if you need, but that's pretty lengthy/complicated compared to just geting the idea of what KMZ's can do for you.

cool, email, bluetooth, wifi, or whatever means you have will transfer that file to whoever else wants it. then they can display it on their phone/tablet/gps/computer/whatever and see what you wanted to share.

2- you want to capture everything on your mapping programs screen. all the waypoints, tracks/routes etc will be zipped into one neat little file that you can share.

as an example, I've attached a KMZ file that you can download and view on your phone/tablet/gps/computer.
That is what I wound up going. Imported the GPX file then used another program to convert it to a KMZ so Google earth could give me a complete route, road and dirt. Worked pretty good...didn't get lost anyway.  :D

 Weird thing was I have been up and down that paved road many,many times. Never noticed the turn off for it.  :o Almost missed it yeasterday...would have if it wasn't for Google earth.
Title: let's talk gps stuff...
Post by: Chitza on April 01, 2019, 07:20:55 AM
I found a new GPS phone app in hiking/mountain biking. It’s called AllTrails. It will record and save your trails. There is a free and a Pro version if anyone is interested in checking it out for use with dirt bike trails.
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